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Research (28)

Saturday, 29 July 2017 12:06

Roop Kanwar 'sati': Women and Media report 1987

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Worldwide, women make up about 50% of the general population but only 24% of the persons heard, read about or seen in newspaper, television and radio news. Only 26% of the people in internet news stories and media news tweets combined are women. These were among the findings of the Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP)’s latest study on the portrayal and representation of women in the news media.

Wednesday, 24 June 2015 15:16

Gender and the media in Asia and the Pacific 2015

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The International Federation of Journalists, UNESCO and UNWomen, released Inside the News: Challenges and Aspirations for Women Journalists in Asia and the Pacific. The report, released on June 22, 2015, documents the issue of gender equity in the media industry throughout the region, as well as what can be done to maintain and protect it.

On International Women’s Day, 2015, the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) Asia-Pacific released a special series of country reports from across the region, exploring gender equity in the region’s media.

Tuesday, 14 October 2014 00:00

The state of female newsroom leadership 2014

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Just one of the 25 highest circulation newspapers in the world – India has seven on that list -- has a woman in the top editorial post. For this report on the state of female newsroom leadership, Nieman Reports interviewed more than 40 academics, media entrepreneurs, investors, publishers, executives, and current and former editors from more than two dozen organisations. 

Saturday, 11 October 2014 00:00

Media and gender: a scholarly agenda (2014)

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Tuesday, 12 August 2014 12:02

Gender equality on the radio (2014)

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Gender pay gap must end, says IFJ

 

March 7, 2012: The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) marked the 101st International Women's Day by calling on media organisations to end the persisting gender pay gap in journalism. The IFJ published, jointly with WageIndicator, Gender Pay Gap in Journalism, a global report which shows that women journalists continue to face persisting discrimination in wages and benefits.

 

"The struggle for equality in media remains the reality," says Beth Costa, IFJ general secretary. "The report proved that little progress has been made to end [the] gender pay gap."

According to the report, women journalists are paid 17% less than male colleagues in Europe, 9% less in former Soviet Union countries and 4% less in South America. In addition, women journalists receive less employment benefits (such as health insurance, pension and holiday allowance), which aggravates the inequality in wage levels. As a result, women journalists are less satisfied with their jobs and working conditions.

The report points out that the pay gap increases with age. Women aged 30 and 45 years face the biggest pay gap when they stay out of a job to take care of children and thus accumulate less tenure for pension and lose seniority.

Further, "Women journalists face the same dangers as male colleagues, and are sometimes more vulnerable to harassment and bullying, yet they are paid less for the work of equal value," says Mindy Ran, chair of the IFJ Gender Council. "And they have less job security."

The IFJ says more measures need to be introduced to end the gender pay gap, such as implementing a pay audit, increasing opportunities for flexible work, improving maternity and paternity rights, removing barriers to building seniority and promotion, and implementing gender-aware collective bargaining.

Data in this report are important “both as a weapon against those who believe the fight for equality has been won, and for policy makers, governments and trade unions to plan further, concrete actions to tackle it," says Ran.

The IFJ along with WageIndicator has launched a Decent Wage Campaign to raise journalists’ awareness of their rights to decent pay and working conditions.


WageIndicator is an independent non-profit foundation which aims for transparency of the labour market by sharing and comparing data through its network of national websites.

The IFJ represents over 600,000 journalists in 134 countries worldwide 

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